How Much Could I Save?

Wondering how much you might save if clause 3 was to be implemented, in particular? The following breakdowns by faculty detail what the savings could look like (please note that not all programs – for both graduate and undergraduate students – are listed, and that the assumptions made for these calculations are below):

Undergraduate:

Arts: $631.10 (Domestic), $6398.87 (International)
Commerce: $935.12 (Domestic), $8279.62 (International)
Engineering: $673.69 (Domestic), $6410.93 (International)
Forestry: $631.10 (Domestic), $6398.87 (International)
Kinesiology: $631.10 (Domestic), $6398.87 (International)
Land and Food Systems: $631.10 (Domestic), $6398.87 (International)
Science: $631.10 (Domestic), $6398.87 (International)

Graduate:

Standard Master’s: $96.04 (Domestic), $168.72 (International)
Standard Doctoral: $583.94 (Domestic), $1025.88 (International)

Assumptions:

1. The base tuition used to calculate is from the 2018 winter session price – some programs within faculties may have variations that are neglected in these calculations, and you can find the exact variations here by undergraduate and graduate programs – these include some programs where the price is substantially different between the first year and subsequent years
2. The annual increase rates are as follows: 2% for continuing undergraduate domestic students, 3% for continuing undergraduate international students, 2% for continuing graduate domestic students, and 2% for continuing graduate international students (please note there are variances to these annual increases in some cases on a program-by-program basis)
3. Four years to complete a degree is assumed (i.e. three years worth of annual increases during a student’s program); at the graduate level, two years for a Master’s program and four years for a Doctoral program are used
4. A course load of 30 credits annually is used, even though this is not standard in some programs
5. Mandatory fees (i.e. athletics, U-Pass) are not included; only tuition itself is used for the calculation
6. We are humans – please note a calculation mistake is entirely possible 🙂